Tag: Goal Setting


Performance Goals

 

Goal target

Performance Goals

 

Performance goals vs. Outcome goals

When linked to long term goals (lifetime or Capstone), provisional goals are best written as performance goals versus outcome goals.  Performance goals focus on the person performance while outcome goals focus strictly on the outcome or result. 

Performance is what the person controls while outcomes are frequently controlled by others.  Unfortunately, outcome goals do not take into account how well a person performed.  Goals based on outcomes are extremely vulnerable to failure because of things beyond your control.

Effective provisional goals focus on performance, not outcome.

A person may have an outstanding performance and not win a contest because other people have performed even better.  Conversely, a person may perform poorly and still win if all others perform at a lower level.  If a person’s goal is to run the 100m race in 12.2 seconds, the person has greater control in achieving this goal than winning.  However, the person has even greater control of achieving a goal if the goal is to run using the correct form, driving the knees through the entire race.  This performance goal ultimately gives the person more control over his/her performance.

When possible set performance goals, not outcome goals.  Make sure you set goals over which you have as much control as possible.  There is nothing more discouraging than failing to achieve a personal goal for reasons beyond your control.  These could be bad business environments, poor judging, bad weather, injury, or just plain bad luck.  If you base your goals on personal performance, then you can keep control over the achievement of your goals and draw satisfaction from them.  For example, you might achieve a personal best time in a race, but still finish fifth as a result of a poor judging decision.  If you had set an outcome goal of being in the top three, then this will be a defeat.  If you set a performance goal of achieving a particular time, then you will have achieved the goal and can draw satisfaction and self-confidence from its achievement.

 

Performance Goal Outcome Goal
Run the 100m race in 12.2 seconds Win first place in the contest
Make contact with opponent and block out after the shot Get the rebound
Sprint after balls coming into play Get to the ball first and control it

 

 

 

Initial Goal Setting worksheet

 

 

Goal setting 2

 

Goals Worksheet

 

 

Lifetime Goals

Lifetime goals are those major goals that you would like to accomplish over your lifetime.  Depending on your age, these goals will be accomplished significantly later on in your life.  Typically, these goals will have accomplishment dates of ten or more years in the future.  Get a job as a teacher, become a professional basketball player, graduate from college, or retire to Florida.

Lifetime goals can be in numerous categories including career, education, family, financial, or just pleasure.  You can have a lifetime goal to become an accountant as well as goals of getting a Masters Degree, having four children, making ten million dollars or traveling around the world.

 

 

“Where you end up isn’t the most important thing.  It’s the road you take to get there.  The road you take is what you’ll look back on and call your life.” –  Tim Wiley

 Goals 1

 

 

 

Setting Lifetime Goals

 

List the goals that you ultimately want to achieve under each of the following categories.

 

Artistic:

 

Attitude:

 

Career:

 

Education:

 

Family / Relationships:

 

Financial:

 

Physical / Health:

 

Pleasure:

 

Public Service / Social:

 

Spiritual / Emotional

 

Travel / Adventure:

 

 

 

Printable Goal Setting Worksheet –  Goal Setting Lifetime Worksheet

 

 

 

Goal Setting Worksheet

My Goals

 

 

Goal Setting Worksheet

 

 

Goal:  ___________________________________________________

 

Type of Goals:     Lifetime     Transitional     Foundational     Provisional

 

 

Goal Statement:

 

 

Reason why you what to reach this goal:

 

 

List other goals associated with this goal:

 

Lifetime: _______________________________________________

Capstone: ____________________________________________

Foundational:  ___________________________________________

 

 

Needs Analysis

 

List skills needed to achieve this goal:

 

 

List information and knowledge needed to achieve this goal:

 

 

Identify who will help you reach your goal:

 

 

List resources needed to achieve your goal:

 

 

List the benefits of achieving your goal:

 

 

List the obstacles to overcome in accomplishing your goal:

 

 

List objectives:

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

List the objectives that can be goals:

 

¥  
¥  
¥  
¥  
¥  
¥  
¥  
¥  

 

 

Action Plan

 

 

Objective

Start Date

Completion Date

¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      
¨      

 

 

Printable Version of Goal Sheet – Goal Setting Worksheet

 

Goal Setting Outline

Steps Goal Setting

Goal Setting Outline

 

Set Lifetime Goals

When setting goals, start with your lifetime goals and work back towards your provisional (short-term) goals.  For example, the lifetime goal may be to win the war.  The transitions goals would be to win specific battles.  The foundational goals would be to win certain positions.

Take the first key step toward reaching your vision, by identifying your lifetime or Life Dimension goals.

  1. Identify and then focus on specific, tangible targets for what you want.
  2. Maintain at least one clearly defined goal for every major interest and role in your life.

Life Dimension Sheet or Life Goal sheet

       

Set Capstone Goals

After you set your Life Dimension goals, set capstone (intermediary) goals that will lead you to your desired goals.

 

Complete a goal sheet

  1.  Set your goals so they are directly aligned with your life’s mission, purpose, and passions.
  2.  Create goals high enough to ignite your spirit and inspire you to take action.
  3. Write down all your goals in specific, measurable detail with declared target dates.

Set Foundational Goals    

After you set your capstone goals, set foundational (short-term) goals that will help build a foundation for your lifetime goals.

 

 

Set Provisional Goals

Lastly, set a whole series of related daily, weekly and monthly goals, complete with starting times and completion dates.  These are provisional goals.  

  1. Lists task associated with achieving the goal
  2. Review the objectives to see if they can also be individual goals.
  3. Change objectives or tasks into goals on a separate goal sheet.

 

Setting your Personal Goals

Your Personal Goals

 

Types of Goals

My Goals

Types of Goals

 

Generally, goals are categorized as either long-term or short-term.  Long-term goals consist of plans you make for your future, typically over a year down the road.  These typically consist of family, lifestyle, career, and retirement goals.  Long-term goals are achieved over time as a person completes the stages of their life.  People set long-term goals for themselves by envisioning what they want to be doing and where they want to be five to twenty years from the present.  Then they use short-term goals to get there.

 

Short-term goals are ones that a person will achieve in the near future, typically in less than one year.  Short-term goals are often, but not always, steppingstones on the way to meeting long-term goals.  These types of stepping stone goals are considered enabling goals because accomplishment of these goals will “enable” a person to achieve an even greater goal.  

Enabling goals usually consist of such topics as education, short-term jobs, as well as valuable work experience.  Each of these often contributes directly to the long-term goals a person sets for himself or herself.

 

These two categories, long and short-term goals, can be further subdivided.  Long-term goals can be either lifetime goals or Capstone goals, while short-term goals can be further categorized be either foundational or provisional goals.

 

Long term   Short term
Lifetime   Foundational
Capstone   Provisional (Stepping-Stone)

 

 

 “The reason most people never reach their goals is that they don’t define them, or ever seriously consider them as believable or achievable.  Winners can tell you where they are going, what they plan to do along the way, and who will be sharing the adventure with them.”  Denis Watley 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term Goals

 

Lifetime Goals

Lifetime goals are those major goals that you would like to accomplish over your lifetime.  Depending on your age, these goals will be accomplished significantly later on in your life.  Typically, these goals will have accomplishment dates of ten or more years in the future.  Get a job as a teacher, become a professional basketball player, graduate from college, or retire to Florida. 

 

Lifetime goals can be in numerous categories including career, education, family, financial, or just pleasure.  You can have a lifetime goal to become an accountant as well as goals of getting a Masters Degree, having four children, making ten million dollars or traveling around the world. 

 

Lifetime goals are often general at first but as you work towards them, they become more specific.  The original goal of “get a job as a teacher” becomes “Get a job teaching math to high school students,” which later evolves into “enter a career in teaching trigonometry to high school seniors.”  As time goes on, the more defined your goals will become.

 

Lifetime goals often are our most meaningful and important goals.  One problem, however, is that the achievement of these goals is usually far in the future.  As a result, we often have trouble staying focused and maintaining a positive attitude toward reaching these goals.  This is why it is helpful to set up enabling goals.

 

Enabling Goal / Operational Goals

An enabling goal is a distinctive type of shorter-term goal.  It is written to help achieve a longer-term goal.  Enabling goals are like stepping stones that help us measure our progress toward reaching longer-term goals.  They can be considered “objectives” of long term goals.

 

You must have long term goals to keep you from being frustrated by short term failures.”  Charles C. Noble

 

 

 

Capstone Goals

Capstone goals are commonly those key goals you will need to accomplish first before you accomplish your lifetime goals.  These goals will typically be accomplished in one to ten years time.  A lifetime goal of becoming a doctor would have Capstone goals of going to college, going to med school, and completing an internship.  A lifetime goal of traveling around the world would have a Capstone goal of saving a certain amount of money. 

 

“To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream, not only plan, but also believe.”  Anatole France

 

 

 

Short-term Goals

 

Foundational Goals

Foundational goals are those short-term goals that will most likely be accomplished in less than one year.  These may be enabling goals that may need to be accomplished prior to the Capstone goals being met.  They are often used as physiological improvements.  You need to get straight A’s next semester in order to get into a good college, so that you can eventually go to medical school.  However, foundational goals can also be stand-alone goals with no link to a Capstone goal or a lifetime goal.  This could be making your high school basketball team, learning how to play three songs on the piano, or saving money for a home theatre system. 

 

“The tragedy of life doesn’t lie in not reaching your goal.  The tragedy lies in having no goals to reach.”  Benjamin Mays

 

 

 

Provisional Goals

Provisional (stepping-stone) goals are usually stepping-stones to the larger goals.   Typically, these are completed in less than a month.  These are the types of goals you focus on a daily basis and are often used for technical improvements.  Many times these may be enabling goals that may need to be accomplished prior to the foundational goals being met.  “Get a 90 or better on the Algebra test next week”, which will help meet the goal of getting straight A’s next semester in order to get into a good college, so that you can eventually go to medical school.  However, like foundational goals, provisional goals can be stand-alone goals with no link to a lifetime, Capstone, or a short-term goal.  This could be “paint the house”, “clean the basement”, or “finish a school project.”

 

 

 

Types of Goals

 

 

 

 

 

Personal Goals

My Goals

Personal Goals

 

Your personal goals should be grown from your values, beliefs, passions, and your sense of purpose.  Before you begin to create our goals, you should go through the process of self discovery.

Determining your values and mission in life is a critical process of goal setting.  Personal goals that are aligned with your values and mission are your most motivating and inspiring goals, and the ones that are most passionate to achieve.  They also deliver the greatest sense of pride and satisfaction once accomplished.

You should set your goals so they are directly aligned with your life’s mission and purpose.  If your goals do not reflect your values or sense of mission, you will struggle to find the motivation to reach them.  For example, if your highest value is “time with family”, you want to consider building that into your goals.  It will guide you to what you need to change in your life or where your focus should be.

Creating Life Plan

Goal Setting Worksheet

Goal Sheet

Setting your Personal Goals

Steps for Goal Setting

 

 

Types of Goals

There are different types of goals.  Some goals are lifetime goals; meaning that we intend to achieve them before we die.  To achieve them, we break them into smaller steps, perhaps ten-year goals or five-year goals.  These intermediate goals are then divided into smaller steps, until we have subdivided the lifetime goals into immediate goals that we can work on today.

Setting personal goals starts with your lifetime goals which are followed by a series of lower level goals.  The series of goals and objectives can continue until you have a list of daily tasks.  By setting up this structure, you are able to break down life goals into a number of small tasks that you need to do each day to reach the lifetime goals.

People set lifetime goals by envisioning what they ultimately want to achieve in various facets of their life.  They then set additional long-term goals for themselves by envisioning what they want to be doing and where they want to be five to ten years from the present.  Then they use short-term goals to get there.

 

 

Goal Setting Process

To set goals; first, write down your goals, and secondly lay out your plan of actions that will determine how to you reach them.  Once you have set your long-term goals, set up your short-term goals that you should complete if you are to reach your lifetime plan.  You can set a 5-year plan, 1-year plan, 6-month plan, and 1-month plan of progressively smaller goals that you should reach to achieve your lifetime goals.  Each of these should be based on the previous plan.  Finally, set a daily “to do” list of things that you should do today to work towards your lifetime goals.

 

Goal Setting

S.M.A.R.T. Goals

S = Specific M = Measurable A = Attainable R = Rewarding T = Time bound

Goal setting

Goal setting

Goals 2

Goal Setting

 

 

Goal setting is a formal process for personal planning.  By setting goals on a routine basis, you decide what you want to achieve, and then you systematically move towards the achievement of those goals.  Goals provide you with a focus for your life.

By setting goals, you create a rippled effect.  The process of setting goals gives you a purpose and direction by allowing you to choose where you want to go in life.  By clarifying your expectations and by challenging yourself, you become more intrinsically motivated.  You force yourself to focus on the acquisition of knowledge and to organize your resources, thus allowing you to become more organized and effective.  As you increase your personal effectiveness, you can improve both your decision making and performance.  As your performance increases, you achieve more and your self-confidence increases.  An increased self-confidence leads to being happier and feeling more fulfilled in life.

Having no goals is like going on a trip without a map.  When there is no destination, vision, or plan, most people tend to drift.  However, when people have a vision of where they want to go, they tend to feel a greater sense of commitment than they would without having the vision.  By creating goals, you create a long-term vision.  You give yourself a sense of purpose and you provide yourself with a focus.  By concentrating your energies and thoughts on your goals, you are better able to use time-management strategies and this in turn enables you to achieve more.

Goal Setting Process

Goal Setting Steps

Your Personal Goals

Types of Goals

Goal Setting Outline

 

 "Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."  - Ralph Waldo Emerson 

 

Printable Version of Goal Setting Outline - Goal setting basic steps outline

Steps Goal Setting

 

Basic Steps for Goal setting

 

1.  Identify your goal

2.  Write down your goal in specific, measurable detail with a declared target date.

S.M.A.R.T.

S = Specific

M = Measurable

A = Attainable

R = Rewarding

T = Time bound

 

3.  Write down the benefits of achieving your goal

 

4.  List the obstacles to overcome in accomplishing your goal

  

5.  List the skills and knowledge required to reach your goal

 

6.  Identify the people and groups you need to work with to reach your goal

  

7.  Develop a plan of action to reach your goal

  • Set a series of related daily, weekly and long-term goals, complete with starting times and completion dates

 

8.  Continuously take an action step toward the attainment of your goal (weekly or daily)

 

The Peak Performance Center

"If you want to be happy, set a goal that commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, and inspires your hopes."  - Andrew Carnegie